A Lesson with Fitta

Again I begin a post with Fitta Chipeta. Otherwise known as ‘Fitta the Fixer’.

  • Malawi, Kasungu, Proverbs, Stories
  • Malawi, Kasungu, Proverbs, Stories
  • Malawi, Kasungu, Proverbs, Stories
  • Malawi, Kasungu, Proverbs, Stories

When in Malawi, if there’s a glitch with a gadget, Fitta will get F Man to sort it.

If you’d like a live chicken, Fitta knows someone who knows someone whose father’s sister’s neigbour can supply you with a bird.

If you want to see the real Kasungu, Fitta will arrange a guide. He can source fuel and spare wheels for your vehicle, translate when things get tricky, and seek medical assisitance should you need it.

He can also sleep in any place, at any time, without losing hold of his phone.

(However, one of Fitta’s primary concerns is to enable children to access education when poverty puts it out of their reach.)

  • Malawi, children, education, proverbs
  • Malawi, children, education, proverbs
  • Malawi, children, education, proverbs
  • Malawi, children, education, proverbs

I was in no doubt, therefore, that Fitta would be able to help me with the gathering of proverbs in Chichewa or Tumbuka, two of Malawi’s many languages. He confirmed that proverbs are in common use in Malawi; for example, a village chief might employ them to settle a dispute in a way that causes minimal offence.

The first proverb Fitta sent was this:

Chikomekome cha nkhuyu mkati muli nyerere.

which means: ‘If you break lovely looking figs you may find ants inside.’ (i.e. All that glitters is not gold.‘)

I asked Fitta for more. He came back with these two:

‘Walira Mvula walira matope.‘ meaning: ‘If you cry for rain, you will get mud.’

and

Pali uchi pali njuchi.’ meaning: ‘Where there is honey there are also bees.

Fitta explained that: “When you want good things you should also expect challenges.

Sensing I was striking gold, I mined Fitta’s mind for more. Fitta obliged with:

Kuthamanga sikufika.’ which translates as: ‘Running is not reaching the destination.’

We were on a roll. Fitta is a busy man, but he is patient. I pressed him again and again, and he replied again and again. Until he sent this:

Nyimbo imodzi sachezera gule.’ meaning: ‘You can’t dance to one song for the whole time for the whole night.

For clarification, Fitta added: “This is said when someone is repeating to talk of one thing for a long time.

I thanked Fitta and wished him a good night. I think I’d better ask about the weather next time …

  • Malawi, children, education, proverbs
  • Malawi, children, education, proverbs
  • Malawi, proverbs, village life, education